Therapy

Myofascial release therapy

What is it?

Fascial Manipulation Technique was invented by renowned Italian physiotherapist, Luigi Stecco, and has proven to be fast and effective method of reducing pain and discomfort in injured tissue.

‘Fascia’ is connective tissue beneath the skin that helps to organise, separate and contain the body’s muscles and internal organs. Fascial Manipulation shifts therapeutic attention from treatment of the consequence to treatment of the cause.

This is quite different from traditional medicine, which, for example, when confronted by a symptomatic organ, examines that organ only, or which, when attending to a specific musculoskeletal area, examines just that isolated site. Our approach recognizes the importance of the physiologic balance of the entire system, focusing on the interconnected nature of the musculoskeletal and of the visceral systems and their connection to one another. By addressing these connections, Myofascial Release Therapy aims to unlock problems and return the system to its physiologic balance.

Problems Myofascial therapy can help

✓ back pain
✓ bladder problems
✓ bulging disc
✓ bursitis
✓  carpal tunnel syndrome
✓ cerebral palsy
✓ cervical and lumbar injuries
✓ chronic fatigue syndrome
✓ chronic pain
✓ degenerative disc disease
✓ emotional trauma
✓ tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
✓  myofascial pain / myofascial pain syndrome
✓ neck pain
✓ osteoarthritis
✓ pelvic pain
✓ plantar fasciitis
✓  pudendal nerve entrapment (Alcock canal syndrome)
✓ sciatica
✓ scars (including hypertrophic, hypersensitive, painful, burn
and mastectomy)
✓ trigeminal neuralgia
✓ vulvodynia
✓ whiplash injury
✓ endometriosis
✓ fibromyalgia
✓ frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis)
✓ headaches and migraines
✓ herniated disc
✓ infertility
✓ interstitial cystitis✓ menstrual problems
✓ scoliosis
✓ shin splints
✓ tennis elbow (epicondylitis)
✓ temporomandibular joint disorder / pain / syndrome

Сontraindications

Myofascial Release Therapy should be avoided in cases of:

• acute rheumatoid arthritis
• advanced diabetes
• fever
• healing fractures
• any systemic or localized infection
• open wounds
• obstructive oedema
• osteomyelitis
• osteoporosis or advanced degenerative changes
• a malignant tumour
• sutures
• hypersensitive skin
• the patient has suffered
an aneurysm
• the patient suffers from
an acute circulatory condition
• the patient is undergoing anticoagulant therapy
• haematoma

Good to know

Pain is an important physical signal and an asset from a therapeutic standpoint: by alerting us to pain, the fragile body declares its limits and enables us to protect it.

Conversely, by covering pain with analgesics (painkillers, in other words), we drown out the “help yell” our body sends us, and continue to move in harmful ways. This can cause impaired joint movement, or articular dyscoordination, which in turn increases the risk of further injury to the related joint.

The fascia therapist uses pain as a diagnostic instrument and, determining its (fascia-based) cause, works on the fascia to prevent further injury and normalize the muscular function. Applied properly, Myofascial Manipulation Technique can alleviate pain and prevent its return.

 

Neuromuscular therapy

What is it?

Neuromuscular Therapy is a highly specialized type of soft tissue therapy designed to relieve pain and return injured tissues to normal function.

Neuromuscular Therapy uses targeted soft tissue treatment, flexion techniques and encouragement of concerted self-care to eliminate the causes of most muscular aches and pains. Specifically, it addresses postural and muscular imbalances, nerve entrapment, ischemia (reduced blood flow to an area of the body) and muscular trigger points.

Often providing long-term pain relief where other approaches have failed, Neuromuscular Therapy restores natural balance to the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems and brings the body back into natural alignment.

Problems Neuromuscular therapy can help

✓ arm and hand pain (this may include tingling
or numbness)
✓ arthritis
✓ back pain (lower and upper)
✓ calf cramps
✓ carpal tunnel syndrome
✓ circulatory problems
✓ hip pain
✓ headaches and migraines
✓ jaw pain✓ knee pain
✓ leg and foot pain (this may
include tingling or numbness)
✓ muscle pain
✓ neck and shoulder pain
✓ plantar fasciitis
✓ sciatica
✓ whiplash injuries
✓ arthritis
✓ sciatica
✓ stiffness or reduced flexibility
(general)
✓ tendonitis
✓ temporomandibular joint
syndrome
✓ iliotibial band syndrome

Сontraindications

Neuromuscular Therapy should be avoided when the following cases apply:

• acute circulatory conditions
• acute rheumatoid arthritis
• fever
• healing fractures
• haematoma
• hypersensitive skin
• any systemic or localized infection
• open wounds
• obstructive oedema
• osteomyelitis
• the patient is undergoing
anticoagulanttherapy
• any systemic or localized infection
• osteoporosis or advanced degenerative
changes
• a malignant tumour
• sutures
• the patient has suffered an aneurysm

Good to know

Neuromuscular Therapy may feel painful, especially at first; when this occurs, it is important to notify the therapist. Indeed, any time the pressure feels too strong, too faint, or seems to be adversely increasing or decreasing, the client should make it known, and the therapist should respond accordingly.

Massage pressure should never be unreasonably or overly painful, but rather work through the muscle spasm to alleviate pain. For this reason, most people describe massage pressure as a “good pain”.

 

Trigger point therapy

What is it?

Trigger points are commonly known as ‘sore points’ on the body. In clinical terms, a trigger point is defined as: “a focus of hyperirritability in a tissue that, when compressed, is locally tender and, if sufficiently hypersensitive, gives rise to referred pain and tenderness” (Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual, by Janet G. Travell, M.D., and David G. Simons, M.D.). In other words, a trigger point is believed to be a spasm or knot in the muscular tissue which causes pain to be transferred to an another, unexpected, or relatively distant, part of the body.

A trigger point in the back, for example, may produce transferred, or “referral” pain in the neck.

Problems Trigger point therapy can help

✓ arthritis
✓ chronic back pain
✓ carpal tunnel syndrome
✓ headaches and migraines
✓ whiplash injuries
✓ joint pain
✓ knee pain
✓ menstrual cramps
✓ multiple sclerosis
✓ sciatica
✓ temporomandibular joint syndrome
✓ muscle pain
✓ muscle spasms, tension, and weakness
✓ postoperative pain
✓ neck and shoulder pain
✓ tendinitis

Сontraindications

• Persons with infectious diseases, open sores, or recent injuries should wait until they have recovered before beginning Trigger Point Therapy.
• Persons taking anticoagulant prescription drugs may experience bruising after Trigger Point Therapy.

Good to know

Trigger Point Therapy is a manual technique designed to treat painful trigger points, and its use of pressure can be uncomfortable or painful for the patient. However, to repeat what has been explained, this pain is usually regarded as a “good and releasing pain”.